brothercyst

Wednesday, April 25, 2007

Last night a friend comped me tickets to the PEN festival opening reading. Salman Rushdie read from DeLillo's White Noise, which convinced me I finally have to read this book.

I look at my phone calendar and feel a chill of horror. I have made too many commitments.

Email.

I'm considering a sensory deprivation chamber: you pay $70 an hour to float in complete darkness in water that is exactly body temperature in absolute silence. Something like ten pounds of salt has been dissolved in the water, so you float very easily.

8 comments:

BLAKE said...

you should definitely read white noise. its pretty fantastic.

that sounds like it would be worth $70. i want to find a weightlessness chamber place where you can float around like in space, though i imagine that would cost a lot more, if its even available.

Bobby Farouk said...

White Noise is good, but not one that I find improves with third and fourth readings. Mao II is the one I keep going back to. I'm not saying it's better, just that if someone with a lazy eye, three days growth of beard, and a photograph of my daughter said I had to choose I'd easily go with Mao II.

Colin said...

I recently finished The Names and am about to close the deal on Libra - both of which, in my half-baked, amateurish opinion, are better than White Noise. They're all great, though.

NickAntosca said...

Ok, it's clear from these comments that I am way behind in my DeLillo.

Blake, you have to be in the air force to do something like that.

Bobby, I haven't been reading your site enough lately, although from time to time as I walk down the street I think of a story I read there.

Colin--I've never even heard of The Names. I'm really behind on this.

trevor johnson said...

I've read about sensory depravation. It's different for everyone, and I don't remember how long it normally takes, but it causes hallucinations. Of course, you're probably not keen on hallucinating, but the initial meditative quality.

I'm interested in learning more about the 19th century wild west. The thing is, I don't want to have to read a dozen biographies to get an overall picture of what it was really like, and I can't take Tombstone as all there is to it. Can anyone recommend a book that details what it was generally like?

NickAntosca said...

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee certainly gives one perspective...

mademoiselle sand said...

the hallucinations are the only thing that have stopped me from booking a sensory deprivation session. i get a sufficient number of 'bulletins all day/ from Immortality' as it is

Billy said...

White Noise is very readable. The Body Artist is also very good. DeLillo is old hat to me now, though, after reading people like Matthew Stadler and Tao Lin.